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Citations needed: Anti-science proponents hate skeptics on Wikipedia

I’ve seen a few remarks going around about how angry the anti-skeptics are about critical comments towards them. Yep, that’s a decent indication that arrows have hit the mark. A common scapegoat seems to be Wikipedia and the volunteers who edit it. But a solution to their problem is simple – add the citations to support their claims. Instead, they throw temper tantrums.

It’s currently a top subject on Natural News (which I wrote about yesterday) prompted by the hubbub over the anti-vaccination documentary by Andrew Wakefield that was cut from the Tribeca Film Festival. The admins of NN have undertaken a campaign to lash out at skeptics in a personal (juvenile and unfair) way. Snarling at skeptical critique is routine. But with the current volume of it, I think it signals that the barbs are cutting, particularly to alternative medicine proponents, paranormalists, and parapsychologists.Read More »

Rule No. 1 for being Internet-smart: Never read NaturalNews

imagesNatural News is the worst of the internet.

Would you get your medical advice from a non-medical doctor with inadequate training? How about one investigated by the FBI for supporting killing of scientists? Would you get your news from a site that denies the basic tenets of science and how the universe works? How about a site that promotes policies that can result in death (AIDS denialism, anti-vaccine, homeopathic remedies for deadly diseases such as Ebola)? Is a site led by a alt med salesman that pushes baseless conspiracy theories and calls respected doctors and scientists names (or worse) a reputable source of information?

No. And this is really serious. NO.

Learn the name NATURALNEWS.COM 

and avoid it entirely. They call themselves “The world’s top news source on natural health”. They are the top source for health misinformation and pseudoscience. This is not in doubt:Read More »

Out-of-body experiences and out-of-comfort-zone challenges

Most of the people who follow what I write are of a skeptical inclination and can be admittedly dismissive of any hint of paranormal ideas. My position is that it’s crucial to be aware of what those involved in these topics firsthand are doing, thinking, and promoting. This is why I follow the fringe and sometimes get quite mired in it. Seriously, we can’t ask people to explore the skeptical literature if we have not explored their niche as well. There is much to learn across the spectrum whether you buy the speculative and paranormal or not.

I became a member of the Society for Psychical Research a few years ago. The SPR was “the first society to conduct organised scholarly research into human experiences that challenge contemporary scientific models.” Based in London, it’s been around since 1882. This post is a glimpse into the January 2016 Journal of the SPR; it mostly pertains to out-of-body experiences (OBEs).Read More »

I’ll be posting here more often now…

I’ve closed up the Doubtful News shop. I received several comments from people who were sad to see it go. I still strongly hold there is a HUGE need for the skeptical POV for these mainstream stories. It’s expected and it’s looked for by many. Sadly, there aren’t that many options these days. See this post on my suggestions for larger-scale investment by skeptical organizations; it can’t just be one or two people going nuts trying to address viral misrepresented news in between work that pays and sleep.

I say Doubtful News was a great success. I learned so much, I made so many mistakes. I was never officially sued, though I got a few threats. No biggie. If you don’t get threats, you’re not making an impact. I think the DN site with almost 8000 posts is ripe to mine for some research project. I hope to do a book eventually.Read More »

The Bigfoot Book: Speculation and supernatural but no skepticism

bfbookNick Redfern’s latest, The Bigfoot Book, has a sound premise and great potential. It’s all about stuff you may never have heard about or saw relating to the Bigfoot phenomena. This is a collection of small articles on topics related to the Bigfoot phenomenon – an “encyclopedia” (though not comprehensive by any means) written in an easy reading style. The sometimes arbitrary titles – such as “Exeter Watchman Publishes First Newspaper Article on Bigfoot” to describe what appears to be the first account of a Bigfoot-like creature in print in the US – are too often not helpfully descriptive. And entries are arranged in annoying alphabetical order making this a book you need to read cover to cover or you will miss the interesting stories buried in it. The collection includes articles on movies, books, scientific reports and documents, historical references, press releases, and more from all over the world. The entries include many from the UK courtesy of Jon Downes and the CFZ. US readers will find many new things in here and summaries of subjects that have not been previously discussed in book form such as Melba Ketchum’s DNA study results and recently released movies like Willow Creek.

It falls short, however, because of a fatal flaw. Serious researchers of cryptozoology will be disappointed as the sources for the content draw heavily from unreliable Internet sites or are copied quotes from other sources.

Read More »

Book review: Margery and Houdini story reveals gaps, not answers

the-witch-of-lime-street-book-coverA review of The Witch of Lime Street: Séance, Seduction, and Houdini in the Spirit World by David Jaher

This is a story of Spiritualism in America in the early 1920s. The darling of the psychic scene was Margery (a faux name) intended to hide the identity of Mina Stinson Crandon, a young, outgoing wife of surgeon Dr. Le Roi Crandon, called “Roy” in the book. The title is a reach that comes from Margery’s claim that she would have been called a witch 150 years ago. Instead, they sent scientific committees to examine her.

Witch has a few things going for it:

  • Good research sources directly from the time period that reveal how popular this phenomenon was.
  • A number of positive blurbs to promote it.
  • Several impressive insights into the characters and institutions of the time.
  • A snazzy glow-in-the-dark cover that represents the glowing paint used on mediums to judge whether they were moving their extremities.

But I was not too impressed overall and would only give a rank of 2.5 out of 5. Read More »